It is called Ooho and is presented as an innovative alternative solution to the classic plastic bottles and to mitigate container contamination. It consists of “spherified” water in a fine ecological and edible membrane that allows drinking without generating waste. And behind it there is an important Spanish touch. One of his co-inventors is Rodrigo García González who, together with his partner Pierre-Yves Paslier and a team in London where other Spanish designers are also, wants to revolutionize the world of bottled water with Ooho.

Its edible spheres are based on a technique already known and in fact popularized in the world of cooking by Ferran Adría, spherification. Ooho uses a double membrane to contain water based on two ingredients: sodium alginate, a natural thickener (E-401) from algae and calcium chloride (E-509). Both compounds combined generate a transparent gel wall, but solid enough to conserve liquid inside. In addition, its materials are much cheaper than plastic, so its manufacture is almost low cost. And of course you can eat.

The design and concept of Ooho have already won numerous awards and their spheres have even been used in various events. Now they want to market them to try to help reduce the environmental impact generated by plastic bottles. Although some voices point out that their ability to be an alternative is limited because the spheres degrade in a few days. But

Behind this idea is Skipping Rocks Lab, a company co-founded and co-directed by the Spaniard Rodrigo García González, along with Pierre-Yves Paslier. And the team also includes other Spaniards such as industrial designer Eugenio Pérez de Lema and chemical engineer Manuel López Romero.

Rodrigo García González is an architect and designer born in Vitoria and trained in Madrid, but also in India, Canada, Chile and the United Kingdom, who defines himself as an “creator” or multifaceted creator. His are also inventions like HOP !, the suitcase that follows its owner via bluetooth and with which he won the James Dyson Award or a system of construction of structures with plastic bottles. In this video, he explains how the idea of ​​creating Ooho came about and how they hope to help change the world of bottled water.

It is time to eat water instead of drinking it. Yes Yes. And end with thousands of plastic bottles that only serve to pollute our oceans and our planet. It’s time to drink water bubbles, explode them in our mouth and enjoy the taste of sustainable packaging: Ooho!

Ooho !: a WoW idea from Skipping Rocks Lab

Skipping Rocks Lab is an innovative sustainable packaging company based in London. They are pioneers in the use of natural materials extracted from plants and seaweed to create containers with low environmental impact.

His first product, Ooho !, has been born to revolutionize the water market now. It is a water bubble created under the inspiration of molecular cuisine. The company has used a technique known as spherification to introduce water into a sphere. Brown seaweed extract and calcium chloride form a gel-like structure that acts as an elastic membrane and retains water inside. To protect it, the company has used a second membrane that functions as a hygienic container. We just have to remove it and the remaining sphere is 100% edible. We can pop it in our mouth or bite carefully to drink the liquid it contains. The outer membrane is not edible, but calm, it will biodegrade after four to six weeks.

Best of all, this flexible spherical container can also be used for other liquids, including soft drinks, spirits and cosmetics, and is made of a patented material, care, cheaper than plastic.

In this way, the start-up offers alternatives without waste to bottles, glasses, plates or any other plastic container. Thus, it stops the arrival in the ocean of 1 billion plastic bottles that would arrive every year and ends with the emission of 300 million kilograms of CO2. What do you think about the invention?

Skipping Rocks Lab is part of the Climate KIC start-up acceleration program, founded by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT) and the Imperial College scientific team.

Skipping Rocks Lab has already received two awards, such as the 2014 Lexus Design Award, the 2014 World Technology Award (environment) held in partnership with Fortune and TIME, the 2015 SEA Award and the 2016 UK Energy Globe Award. A We think they are few. We can give the best prize, eating their water and making this idea an example to follow. As? Eat water, my friend!

Ooho, simpler and simple impossible, so simple that even people could do it at home. Ooho is a small transparent membrane filled with water, a large drop of edible and biodegradable water. Its production expense is only 2 cents. Ooho arises from the need to find an alternative to the millions of plastic bottles that are used and discarded every day for water consumption, and important note, the vast majority is not recycled and ends up damaging the environment.

Rodrigo García González, Pierre Paslier and Guillaume Couche created Ooho, now they want to introduce it to the market through Skipping Rocks Lab.

Ooho is a vessel that contains water in a double membrane, using a technique to shape liquids in spheres called “spherification.” A technique that encapsulates foods with gelatin textures, so that they have a consistency similar to fish eggs.

Ooho is made of algae and calcium chloride, at a very low cost. To drink the water you just have to break the sphere and sip the water inside. But don’t worry, it’s edible.

You are here: Home / Efficient water management / Ooho. Biodegradable and edible water bottle

Ooho Biodegradable and edible water bottle

Ooho water you can drink

Ooho, simpler and simple impossible, so simple that even people could do it at home. Ooho is a small transparent membrane filled with water, a large drop of edible and biodegradable water. Its production expense is only 2 cents. Ooho arises from the need to find an alternative to the millions of plastic bottles that are used and discarded every day for water consumption, and important note, the vast majority is not recycled and ends up damaging the environment.

Rodrigo García González, Pierre Paslier and Guillaume Couche created Ooho, now they want to introduce it to the market through Skipping Rocks Lab.

Ooho is a vessel that contains water in a double membrane, using a technique to shape liquids in spheres called “spherification.” A technique that encapsulates foods with gelatin textures, so that they have a consistency similar to fish eggs.

Edible ooho

Ooho is made of algae and calcium chloride, at a very low cost. To drink the water you just have to break the sphere and sip the water inside. But don’t worry, it’s edible.

Ooho Biodegradable and edible water bottle

The design won the second annual Lexus Design Award 2014.

It could be the solution to the very serious problem of water bottled in plastic. Remember that water packaging uses more fossil fuels. Most water bottles are manufactured with polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a plastic derived from petroleum. 86% of used plastic water bottles in the US They become trash or fill. The incineration of used bottles generates toxic by-products such as chlorinated gas. Buried bottles can take up to 1,000 years to biodegrade. 90% of the cost of bottled water is per bottle.

Hence the great revolution that this invention would entail on our planet, a positive impact on our society that is very difficult to quantify but of millionaire proportions.

Bearing in mind that 1.9 million plastic bottles are used daily (especially those that store water), a team of researchers from the London company Skipping Rocks Lab wanted to revolutionize the “packaging” by manufacturing a small container, Biodegradable and edible in the form of water bubbles. But is this a possible solution to the global supply problem?

The team was based on a culinary technique known as spherification. This, which consists of forming a liquid in spheres that visually and textually resemble caviar, was patented by Unilever engineer William Peschardt in the 1940s and introduced into modernist cuisine by Spanish chef Ferran Adrià. So, Ooho! apply an evolved version of the spherification to one of the most basic and essential elements for life, water.

The spherical container is made of a membrane based on chlorine, algae and calcium, the content of which can hold up to 50 milliliters of water (the ideal volume to quench thirst without overfilling, according to its creators). Its designers, the Spaniard Rodrigo García González, and the French Guillaume Couche and Pierre Paslier, say that their goal is “to provide the comfort of water bottles while limiting the environmental impact”, since it is enough to make a hole in the surface and then sip the water inside. When finished, the user can decide between eating the container or throwing it away, and since it is biodegradable, there is no harm to the environment.

In this video, Rodrigo García presented Ooho! In 2015 at the flagship event of X-the moonshot factory held in Berlin:

All this represents a huge advantage over the bottled water sector, whose manufacturing and transportation requires oil (a non-renewable resource), and where its industry seeks new ways to respond to consumers’ concern about the environmental impact of water bottles. ; but it doesn’t stay there; Thanks to its characteristics (cheap, resistant, small, edible and biodegradable), not only many people could do it in their homes, but the manufacture of it at industrial scales by an entity, company or NGO, could bring water to those parts of the world where this basic good is scarce.

The recipe for this invention, which won the 2014 Lexus Design Awards and was presented to the world last April 8 in Italy during Milan Design Week, is free. This means that any entity (public or private, with or without profit, governmental or not) can use it and, together with its resources, could have in its hands the solution to the world’s water supply.

There are many factors to consider when bringing water to countries with great difficulties in water supply, and it may not be as easy as it sounds. But this drop of edible water may also be a small step towards solving global water supply problems. “A small step for man, a great step for mankind.” Or was it not?